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Disaster Recovery Planning: Preparing for Winter Weather

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The arrival of winter means many things: family gatherings, cozy fires and warm sweaters and scarves. It also means cold weather, fewer daylight hours, the flu season and travel hazards including bitter cold and snowy and icy roads. In the data center industry, being prepared for winter means businesses should review their strategies for potential outages due to storm-related impacts.

Unleash the Power at the Gartner Summit

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December is always a busy month, and it’s no different here at CenturyLink. Though we enjoy occasional office holiday festivities and those extra calorie cookies and desserts like many others, we remain committed serving our data center customers and growing our portfolio of data center hosting offerings. This December is especially busy for us as we work towards closing on the acquisition of CenturyLink’s data center business by BC Partners and Medina Capital through the recently announced strategic agreement.

Partners in Innovation

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Silicon Valley leads the nation as a region conducive to supporting successful start-up and global technology companies. In fact, Silicon Valley tech companies’ total GDP (gross domestic product) exceeds $535 billion and the area supports between 14,000 and 19,000 active startups compared to the US metro average of 4,000. The Silicon Valley technology workforce continues to expand at a faster rate than most other innovation hubs in the nation. As an example, output in its innovation industries grew by 174 percent between 1994 and 2014.

A Career in Colocation: My Story

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When you ask young children what they want to be when they grow up, you often receive a lot of the same answers: firefighter, nurse, police officer, teacher, veterinarian, etc. Not many kids say their dream is to work in the data center industry, even though it’s an important part of the business world, especially as technology continues to advance at a staggering pace.

CH3 Data Center: Making it Big

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You may have heard the phrase “whatever you’re thinking, think bigger.” In business, getting bigger usually is a positive thing, regardless of the industry. When it comes to colocation, bigger means more space and power and a greater potential for growth for data center customers.

M&A: Thinking Strategically About IT Infrastructure Moves

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Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) typically result in expanded capabilities and enhanced revenue opportunities for companies, but they also tend to create real challenges for the CIO and the overall IT environment. In fact, mergers and acquisitions often result in a need for companies to revisit and/or optimize their overall IT and data center strategies.  This is especially true when the transaction results in the company suddenly possessing multiple data centers, duplicative systems, processes, applications and personnel.

M&A: Combining IT Infrastructure Doesn’t Have to be Complicated

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Although the United States economy represents approximately 20 percent of total global output, its real gross domestic product (GDP) grew only 1.2 percent in the second quarter of 2016 and 2.1 percent in 2015. It’s surprising, then, that 2015 marked the busiest year ever for mergers and acquisitions (M&A). The U.S. M&A volume increased 43.3 percent in 2015 compared to 2014, accumulating approximately $3 trillion in activity from 15,922 announced deals.

The Data Center Industry: Concentrating on Market Changes

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Like many other industries, the data center industry has experienced numerous changes over its existence. Wholesale data center buyers previously included large enterprises and service providers, while retail colocation buyers were comprised of medium-sized enterprises and ecosystem players. The lines between these two segments are now blurring, and the data center market is now faced with new price pressures, competitors and channels. Today’s wholesale providers are competing on smaller enterprise deals, and their retail counterparts are competing on larger deals as the customer mix moves toward service providers.