M&A: Thinking Strategically About IT Infrastructure Moves


Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) typically result in expanded capabilities and enhanced revenue opportunities for companies, but they also tend to create real challenges for the CIO and the overall IT environment. In fact, mergers and acquisitions often result in a need for companies to revisit and/or optimize their overall IT and data center strategies.  This is especially true when the transaction results in the company suddenly possessing multiple data centers, duplicative systems, processes, applications and personnel.

M&A: Combining IT Infrastructure Doesn’t Have to be Complicated


Although the United States economy represents approximately 20 percent of total global output, its real gross domestic product (GDP) grew only 1.2 percent in the second quarter of 2016 and 2.1 percent in 2015. It’s surprising, then, that 2015 marked the busiest year ever for mergers and acquisitions (M&A). The U.S. M&A volume increased 43.3 percent in 2015 compared to 2014, accumulating approximately $3 trillion in activity from 15,922 announced deals.

The Data Center Industry: Concentrating on Market Changes


Like many other industries, the data center industry has experienced numerous changes over its existence. Wholesale data center buyers previously included large enterprises and service providers, while retail colocation buyers were comprised of medium-sized enterprises and ecosystem players. The lines between these two segments are now blurring, and the data center market is now faced with new price pressures, competitors and channels. Today’s wholesale providers are competing on smaller enterprise deals, and their retail counterparts are competing on larger deals as the customer mix moves toward service providers.

The Data Center Market: Converging on Canada


Canada continues to grow and expand as a strong market for colocation and data center services.  In fact, data center space in some key Canadian markets – such as Toronto and Montreal, for instance – is expected to grow by as much as 20 percent annually over the next two to three years. Some Canadian businesses want to keep their data in their own country, while other companies invest in colocation in Canada to expand their global footprint. CenturyLink’s enterprise-grade cloud infrastructure solutions have been offered in Canada since 2010 and address data sovereignty requirements for Canadian enterprises and multi-national corporations seeking to establish a local presence.  

Executive Roundtable: Growing Your Business, Not Your Data Center


Businesses that build their own data center may have complete control over their operating environment and the capability to leverage existing space, but those data centers often lack the necessary scalability to be successful over a long period of time. Plus, building and maintaining a data center can be a very costly proposition. It costs approximately $200 per square foot to construct a data center, and that cost doesn’t include the necessary cooling, security and connectivity measures, which adds another $7 to $9 million dollars per megawatt to bring a fully functional data center online. Even businesses with enough capital to cover the upfront costs of building or expanding an on premise data center don’t always take into consideration the costs necessary for planning and design, property investment, power expenses, multi-level security, staffing and maintenance.

Ensuring ROI and Maximizing Uptime: A Panel Discussion


The cost of an unplanned data center outage can be as much as $9,000 per minute, and outages cost enterprises an astounding $700 billion per year. IT professionals have their hands full with this issue, especially because an estimated 70 percent of all data center outages are the result of human error. In addition to dealing with possible outages, these professionals are being asked to utilize infrastructure more efficiently while constantly delivering uptime as technology continues to evolve and data requirements expand.

Going Global: Expanding IT (Part Two)


In my most recent blog, I discussed some challenges companies face when trying to expand their footprint on an international level. Whether spreading IT infrastructure among multiple, smaller data centers or lacking the knowledge to take advantage of interconnection in global markets, most companies aren’t fully prepared to spearhead a move into different parts of the world.

Going Global: Expanding IT


There are many popular brands here in the United States that are also well-known across the world: fast food restaurant chains, athletic apparel vendors, technology companies and many more. However, these companies didn’t start out with a global presence – for most, it happened gradually.